Biden to meet with CEOs on semiconductor shortage |

(FILES) In this file photo US President Joe Biden speaks about gun violence prevention in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on April 8, 2021. – President Joe Biden holds a rare meeting on April 12, 2021 with opposition Republican lawmakers, as well as Democratic allies, to push his more than $2 trillion infrastructure bill — a daring bid to rebuild the United States and cement his place in history. The White House meeting between Biden and eight members of Congress is being stage-managed to show that the new president has made good on his promise to end the divisiveness that turned Washington into a permanent dog fight under Donald Trump. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP)

President Joe Biden will meet virtually with the CEOs of some of America’s biggest computer and auto companies Monday for crisis talks on the global shortage of semiconductors that is hobbling car manufacturing.

The White House said Biden will briefly join the meeting on “semiconductor and supply chain resilience,” which is being led by National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan, National Economic Council Director Brian Deese, and the Secretary of Commerce, Gina Raimondo.

Coming in over video link will be chief executives from giant companies including General Motors, Ford, Northrup Grumman, Alphabet/Google, and US semiconductor powerhouse Intel.

In all, 19 company bosses are listed as attending, also including Mark Liu, executive chairman of the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), one of the lynchpins in the world’s supply for the vital electronic components.

Biden administration officials also intend to make a case for the president’s $2 trillion infrastructure package.

A White House handout last week on the infrastructure plan endorsed $50 billion for a new Commerce Department office to support the production of critical goods and backed congressional legislation to invest another $50 billion in semiconductor manufacturing and research.

The crunch in semiconductors has badly dented US auto manufacturing, with General Motors, Ford and other carmakers temporarily shuttering some factors or reducing production.

The shortage has also raised worries throughout the personal electronics universe, generating potentially higher prices for popular gadgets like game consoles and computer tablets.